5 Communication Practices That Set Leaders Apart

Moving into a leadership position comes with a collection of additional responsibilities and (often) unspoken expectations. When communicating as a leader, you must constantly be aware of the intricate details of your own behavior. It’s essential to communicate in a way that will be heard, understood, and encourage action. Not every leader is born with… [Continue Reading]

Your Five Contributions

Peter Drucker once suggested that the most important question executives can ask themselves is “What can I contribute?” As important as the question is, each of should realize that we are capable of several types of contribution; five to be exact according marketing blogger Seth Godin. His brief enumeration and description of each will give… [Continue Reading]

“What’s Well Begun…..

……Is half done”, goes the popular saying.  This appears to apply to child raising as well. As a leader of your organization, do you ponder why some employees are more successful than others?  Perhaps, just perhaps it dates back to our childhood.  Check out this recap of 13 findings (with links to the underlying research) regarding… [Continue Reading]

Moby Dick Management

Strategic intent is key to the success of any business.   A great (and cautionary) literary exposition of this is Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick.”  In this timeless classic, the CEO  (Captain Ahab) clearly had the requisite strategic intent to succeed;  but in the end failed utterly not only in his quest to kill the white whale… [Continue Reading]

Was Gladwell Wrong?

Malcolm Gladwell’s book “Outliers”  posits that Bill Gates, the Beatles and other very successful persons attained that status by adhering to the “10,000 Hour Rule” of committing at least that much time to honing their skills.   This brief but important article from the Smithsonian takes issue with Gladwell’s claim and holds that “The 10,000 Hour Rule is… [Continue Reading]

Pick One: Change or Improvement?

Most C-level executives find themselves besieged by those with a vested interest in changing things.  Often consultants, new hires, academics and others often seem to be proposing change for change’s sake before looking at the reason why existing processes, institutions, traditions and protocols came to be in the first place. WSJ Columnist Peggy Noonan offers… [Continue Reading]